Weybourne July 04


The inshore diving at Weybourne is so close to shore it sometimes seems too easy! It can be very weather dependant but although the summer took a day off the sea behaved well with only a slight swell making its way in from the rough stuff way offshore, which made the Holt boat abort their plans for the day. A drift along the gullies went down well - lots of life and a brisk current - and we observed that slack on the Rosalie is about 2 hours after high tide and made the most of the photo opportunities. P.S. We found a sure fire way of locating the Rosalie, swim out and tie a rope to it the night before. Very effective.

It sometimes seems there isn't enough space for them all
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Norfolk is lobster central - note dismantled velvet crab in foreground
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The Rosalie is always well decorated
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Anemones of all sizes stud the metalwork of the wreck
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The 'petals' are the convoluted edge of a disc
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Decorator crabs have near perfect disguise against the growth on the wreck - not so good on a hand
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These Flabbelina Pedata nudibranches are very common off Weybourne
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Lemon lightbulb tunicates
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These large anemones look like amazing marbled cake
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Flabbelinas are probably more common here than abroard - they are a relatively rare sight in Gozo for example
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These two are getting quite involved - which probably explains why they are so numerous.
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The translucent arms of the amenones were mobile enough to be overpowering large jelly fish on the wreck - even though they're little more than water.
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Close up into an anemone
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Interesting banding on this one, and it has a sponge to protect it
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This one seems to have garters on its arms
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This depressed flat fish might be a flounder or a very young halibut
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The polyps of this little soft coral colony are each like a tiny, glassy amenone
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I hadn't seen these big prawns off Norfolk before
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I'd like to think this was an Onchidoris inconspicua but since that's rare thats just say its almost certainly an Onchidorid of some kind
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At least the Flabelinas are easy to identify
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Although they hang around in the current and are always folded up... when you take a picture
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Last time we went there were more of these Janolus Cristata - they were larger then too
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These are around 15mm long
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These sponges have sprung up too
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The water was relatively clear - so perhaps the anemones were still hungry
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For most visitors to the Rosalie its the amenones which they remember most
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If you were a prawn your memories might not be so fond
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This one is raspberry ripple!
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Velvet swimming crabs always look either guilty or angry
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This Flabellina is just passing a tiny tubeworm's tube - I didn't get any pictures of them
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See what I mean about them not holding still?
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There were a lot of one clawed crabs about, these two have got lucky and can have a proper fight!
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Rob Spray.